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Tending land in Mozambique

Mission

Established in 1962, the Land Tenure Center (LTC) works to promote equitable and sustainable land stewardship, particularly where biodiversity or local livelihoods are at risk. LTC recognizes that land resources and ecosystem services are especially important to those who suffer disproportionate hardship when land is degraded or access denied. LTC supports advanced interdisciplinary research to identify solutions and guide policy reform. LTC fosters public dialogue and innovation by creating learning networks across the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, and among local, national and international communities.

"The seed is mine. The ploughshares are mine. The span of oxen is mine. Everything is mine. Only the land is theirs."

Kas Maine, from The Seed is Mine: The Life of Kas Maine, a South African Sharecropper 1894-1985, by Charles Van Onselen

Collaboration

LTC emphasizes a place-based, interdisciplinary approach that engages students and faculty in collaborations with local host institutions and individuals in policy analysis, research, training and implementation. LTC designs its programs to inform policymakers, scholars, donors, government agencies, non-governmental organizations and communities in the following areas:

  • land use, land tenure and livelihoods
  • environmental governance
  • land stewardship for sustaining ecosystem services and biodiversity

The globally recognized Land Tenure Collection and Publication Series further LTC's outreach mandate. These are available through the University library system and on LTC's Publications page.

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LTC SPEAKER SERIES

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FEATURED RESEARCH

close up of Ian Baird

'Indigenous Peoples' and land: Comparing communal land titling and its implications in Cambodia and Laos

In 2001 a new Land Law was adopted in Cambodia. It was significant because - for the first time - it recognised a new legal category of people, 'Indigenous Peoples' or chuncheat daoem pheak tech in Khmer, and it also introduced the legal concept of communal land rights to Cambodia. Over a decade after the 2001 Land Law was promulgated, this article considers some aspects of its effects.


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