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AUGUST 23, 2012
West Nile's 'super spreader:' How about the American robin?
Since arriving in 1999 from Europe or Africa, West Nile virus has spread to nearly every state and a growing body of evidence is pointing to the iconic American robin as the primary culprit for spreading the disease in the Northeastern and Midwestern U.S.


AUGUST 17, 2012
Holloway honored for education and mentorship in clean energy
Tracey Holloway, director of the Nelson Institute Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, is the recipient of the first-ever C3E award for education and mentorship in clean energy.


AUGUST 3, 2012
Layered learning: Students solve local challenges in community-scale composting class
After six hours of shoveling compost in 100-degree weather, Natalie Cook, Hui Wang and Jen Weisheit were deemed the compost queens. The UW-Madison students and five classmates were part of Community-Scale Composting, a summer capstone course for students earning the undergraduate environmental studies certificate or major.


AUGUST 1, 2012
Forget blizzards and hurricanes, heat waves are deadliest
When it comes to gnarly weather, tornadoes, blizzards and hurricanes seem to get most of our attention, perhaps because their destructive power makes for imagery the media can't ignore. But for sheer killing power, heat waves do in far more people than even the most devastating hurricane. Ask medical historian Richard Keller.


JULY 30, 2012
Nelson Institute alumna accepts international award on behalf of Wisconsin Wetlands Association
Nelson Institute alumna Katie Beilfuss accepted the 2012 Ramsar Wetland Conservation Award for Education on behalf of the Wisconsin Wetlands Association at a July 6 ceremony in Bucharest, Romania. Beilfuss serves as Outreach Programs Director for the organization.


JULY 27, 2012
Cathy Middlecamp: Lessons in climate change on Alaska's northern coast
Cathy Middlecamp, a UW-Madison associate professor of environmental studies and Howe Bascom Professor of Integrated Liberal Studies, traveled to Barrow, Alaska, in July to teach students from native villages above the Arctic Circle about climate change. She prepared the following report about her experience.


JULY 26, 2012
Speaking for nature: Q&A with professor Roberta Hill
Can a student fully grasp environmentalism without diving into Aldo Leopold's legendary essays and books? Understand environmental crises without reading the work of Rachel Carson? These are questions that Roberta Hill, a UW-Madison professor of English and Nelson Institute affiliate, raises in the classroom.


JULY 26, 2012
Poetry by Roberta Hill
Poems from Roberta Hill, UW-Madison professor of English. View our conversation with Hill to learn more about her experience teaching the course Literature of the Environment: Speaking for Nature, along with her thoughts on the importance of blending science and the humanities.


JULY 23, 2012
Two UW"Madison researchers build ties with Indonesia
Paleoanthropologist John Hawks and climate scientist Dan Vimont had never crossed paths on the Madison campus due to their very divergent areas of study. But they landed on common ground at the Kavli Indonesian-American Frontiers of Science Symposium in Solo, Indonesia.


JULY 17, 2012
Sustainability engineers fill key industry needs
Patrick Eagan likes to look at sustainability as an opportunity for engineers to become leaders in green development. Today, sustainability is no longer just a concept but a global imperative.


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