Everyone's Earth: Sharing Experiences on a Restless Planet

Conference Speakers


FEATURED SPEAKERS:


Julian Agyeman
Paolo Bacigalupi
Stewart Brand
Emily St. John Mandel
Paul Robbins
Sherri L. Smith

See concurrent session speakers.

Julian Agyeman

Julian Agyeman

Julian Agyeman, Ph.D. FRSA FRGS is a professor of urban and environmental policy and planning at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. He is the originator of the concept of 'just sustainabilities,' the full integration of social justice and sustainability, defined as: the need to ensure a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, in a just and equitable manner, whilst living within the limits of supporting ecosystems.

As an ecologist/biogeographer turned environmental social scientist, he has both a science and social science background which helps frame his perspectives, research and scholarship. He thrives at the borders and intersections of a wide range of knowledges, disciplines and methodologies which he utilizes in creative and original ways in his research.

He was co-founder in 1988, and chair until 1994, of the Black Environment Network (BEN), the first environmental justice-based organization of its kind in Britain. He was co-founder in 1996, and is now editor-in-chief of Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability and was elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society of the Arts (FRSA) in the same year. The mission of the RSA is to enrich society through ideas and action. In 2016 he became a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (FRGS).

He is series editor of Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice published by Zed Books and Co-Editor of the series Routledge Equity, Justice and the Sustainable City. He is also contributing editor to Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development and a member of the editorial board of the Australian Journal of Environmental Education. In addition, he is an affiliate at the Civitas Athenaeum Laboratory at KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, a studio associate at The Studio at the Edge of the World, University of Tasmania Creative Exchange Institute, and a senior scholar at The Center for Humans and Nature, Chicago.

His publications, which number more than 160, include books, peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, published conference presentations, published reports, book reviews, newspaper articles, op-eds and articles in professional magazines and journals. His books include Just Sustainabilities: Development in an Unequal World (co-edited with Robert D Bullard and Bob Evans: MIT Press 2003), Sustainable Communities and the Challenge of Environmental Justice (NYU Press 2005), Environmental Inequalities Beyond Borders: Local Perspectives on Global Injustices (co-edited with JoAnn Carmin: MIT Press 2011), Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability (co-edited with Alison Hope Alkon: MIT Press 2011), Introducing Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice (Zed Books 2013), Incomplete Streets: Processes, Practices, and Possibilities (co-edited with Stephen Zavestoski: Routledge 2014) and Sharing Cities: A Case for Truly Smart and Sustainable Cities (co-authored with Duncan McLaren: MIT Press 2015).

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Paolo Bacigalupi

Paolo Bacigalupi

Paolo Bacigalupi's writing has appeared in Wired magazine, High Country News, Salon.com, OnEarth magazine, the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Asimov's Science Fiction magazine. His short fiction has been anthologized in various "Year's Best" collections of short science fiction and fantasy, nominated for three Nebula Awards, four Hugo Awards, and won the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for best science fiction short story of the year. His short story collection Pump Six and Other Stories was a 2008 Locus Award winner for Best Collection and also named a Best Book of the Year by Publishers Weekly.

His debut novel The Windup Girl was named by Time magazine as one of the ten best novels of 2009, and also won the Hugo, Nebula, Locus, Compton Crook, and John W. Campbell Memorial Awards. Internationally, it has won the Seiun Award (Japan), The Ignotus Award (Spain), The Kurd-Laßwitz-Preis (Germany), and the Grand Prix de l'Imaginaire (France).

His debut young adult novel, Ship Breaker, was a Micheal L. Printz Award Winner, and a National Book Award Finalist, and its sequel, The Drowned Cities, was a 2012 Kirkus Reviews Best of YA Book, A 2012 VOYA Perfect Ten Book, and 2012 Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist.

He has also written Zombie Baseball Beatdown for middle-grade children, about zombies, baseball, and, of all things, meatpacking plants. Another novel for teens, The Doubt Factory, a contemporary thriller about public relations and the product defense industry was a both an Edgar Award and Locus Award Finalist.

His latest novel for adults is the New York Times Bestseller The Water Knife, a near-future thriller about climate change and drought in the southwestern United States.

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Stewart Brand

Stewart Brand

Stewart Brand is co-founder and president of The Long Now Foundation and was a co-founder of Global Business Network. Now Brand, a lifelong environmentalist, wants to re-create -- or "de-extinct" -- a few animals that have disappeared from the planet, through the Revive and Restore project.

He created and edited the Whole Earth Catalog (National Book Award), and co-founded the Hackers Conference and The WELL. His books include The Clock of the Long Now, How Buildings Learn, and The Media Lab. His most recent book, titled Whole Earth Discipline, is published by Viking in the US and Atlantic in the UK. He graduated in biology from Stanford University and served as an Infantry officer.

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Emily St. John Mandel

Emily St. John Mandel

Emily St. John Mandel is the author of four novels, most recently Station Eleven, which was a finalist for a National Book Award and the PEN/Faulkner award, and won the 2015 Arthur C. Clarke Award. She lives in New York City with her family.

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Paul Robbins

Paul Robbins

Paul Robbins is the director of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he oversees the institute's mission of serving as a world leader in addressing environmental change. He is leading a variety of initiatives in educational innovation, including the recent establishment of a new professional master's degree in Environmental Conservation.

Robbins' research focuses on human interactions with nature and the politics of natural resource management, addressing questions spanning conservation conflicts, urban ecology, and environment-health interactions. His research experience includes extensive fieldwork in rural India and national studies of consumer chemical risk behaviors in America, as well as engagement with stakeholders, planners, communities and health departments in the US West.

He is author of the foundational textbook Political Ecology and of research articles in venues addressing conservation science, social science, and the humanities. His award-winning book Lawn People is widely recognized as one of the most accessible books on the environmental politics of daily life. He has taught topics ranging from environmental studies and natural resource policy to social theory.

Robbins previously led the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona, which he helped establish and served for two years as director. A UW-Madison alumnus with a bachelor's degree in anthropology, Paul Robbins also holds a master's degree and doctorate in geography, both from Clark University.

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Sherri L. Smith

Sherri L. Smith

Sherri L. Smith is the author of several award-winning young adult novels, including the 2009 California Book Awards Gold Medalist, Flygirl -- a World War II adventure the Washington Post named a best book of the year, and Orleans, a "cli-fi" adventure set in a future, post-disaster New Orleans. Her novels appear on multiple state lists and have been named Amelia Bloomer and American Library Association Best Books for Young People selections.

Smith was a judge for the 2014 National Book Awards in Young People's Literature and is a three-time writer-in-residence at Hedgebrook writers' retreat. She's worked in comic books, animation, and construction. Currently, she teaches in the MFA Writing program at Goddard College and the Children's Writing MFA program at Hamline University. Her latest books are the middle grade historical fantasy, The Toymaker's Apprentice, and the young adult noir mystery, Pasadena. Learn more at www.sherrilsmith.com.

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CONCURRENT SESSION SPEAKERS:



David Abel

David Abel

David Abel I am currently pursuing a PhD in Environment & Resources through the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. I earned my BS from UW in Mechanical Engineering and Environmental Studies along with a certificate in Engineering for Energy Sustainability in 2015. I subsequently extended this to a joint MS in Mechanical Engineering and Environment & Resources with a certificate in Energy Analysis and Policy before beginning the PhD program. My research explores the intersection of energy and the atmosphere. Specifically, I strive to understand the impacts of energy technologies, trends, and behaviors on air quality, climate, and public health and vice versa.

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Carol Barford

Carol Barford

Carol Barford is the director of the Nelson Institute Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE). Her scientific work centers on agriculture, bioenergy, environmental quality, and risks in food systems. Prior to joining SAGE, Barford studied forest carbon cycling. Her synthesis of biometric and atmospheric methods of measuring forest carbon balance appeared in Science (November 2001).

For her Ph.D. thesis, Barford measured nitrogen stable isotope effects of denitrification and applied the results to track greenhouse gas production in agriculture and wastewater. More recently, Barford spent the 2010-11 academic year as a visiting fellow at Wolfson College, Cambridge University (UK). There she continued and developed her Wisconsin projects and collaborations with British scientists in the Computational Ecology and Environmental Science Group at Microsoft Research, Cambridge. These collaborations were based on continuing interests in environmental decision support and data-constrained minimal models.

Barford is a native of central Illinois. She completed her B.A. in biology and M.S. in ecology at Boston University, and Ph.D. in environmental engineering at Harvard University. Barford held a post-doctoral position in atmospheric chemistry at Harvard before joining SAGE.

You can see Barford every Thursday during spring and fall semesters when she hosts the Weston Roundtable, SAGE's public lecture series on environmental-sustainability science, technology and policy topics.

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Victoria Barrett

victoria barrett

New Yorker, Victoria Barrett, participated in the COP21 United Nations climate summit in Paris on behalf of the Alliance for Climate Education. She is a plaintiff in the lawsuit brought by Our Children's Trust against the United States government for failing to act to protect our climate for future generations. She has spoken to media outlets and the general public on the importance of protecting our climate in the pursuit of social justice. Additionally, Victoria is a member of the 2016 RYSE Youth Council and most recently addressed the United Nations General Body on Earth Day, including more than 150 heads of state, before the formal signing of the Paris Agreement.

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Kata Beilin

Kata Beilin

Kata Beilin is a professor in the UW-Madison Department of Spanish and Portuguese and a faculty affiliate at the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and is a faculty associate in the Center for Culture, History, and the Environment (CHE). She is currently working on two book projects: The Rise of the Resistant; Interspecies Resistance to Genetically Engineered Crops in the Hispanic World and Cultures of Environmental Change in Contemporary Spain.

She has recently published In Search of Alternative Biopolitics: Antibulfighting, Animality and the Environment in Contemporary Spain (Ohio State University Press, 2015), and co-edited Ethics of Life; Contemporary Iberian Debates (Vanderbilt University Press, 2016) as well as Polemical Companion to Ethics of Life.

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Calire Bjork

calire bjork

Claire Bjork is a PhD student in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and is a graduate associate in the Center for Culture, History, and the Environment. Her research focuses on community-based, multicultural approaches to land care and relationship building through restoration. She earned her BA in Psychology and French at the UW-Madison, as well as an MS in Environment and Resources from the Nelson Institute. Her master's thesis was on community capacity building in the Latino Earth Partnership culturally-based environmental education initiative with schools and community centers in Madison, WI.

Claire works for the Earth Partnership program at the UW, a restoration education program that promotes native habitat restoration as a process for community learning and land stewardship. The program involves collaborations between K-12 educators, youth, community organizations, natural resources professionals, five Native Nations in Wisconsin, and global partnerships.

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Dominique Brossard

Dominique Brossard

Dominique Brossard is professor and chair in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an affiliate of the UW-Madison Robert & Jean Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies, the UW-Madison Center for Global Studies and the Morgridge Institute for Research. Her teaching responsibilities include courses in strategic communication theory and research, with a focus on science and risk communication. Brossard's research agenda focuses on the intersection between science, media and policy with the Science, Media and the Public (SCIMEP) research group, which she co-directs.

A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a former board member of the International Network of Public Communication of Science and Technology, Brossard is an internationally known expert in public opinion dynamics related to controversial scientific issues. She is particularly interested in understanding the role of values in shaping public attitudes and using cross-cultural analysis to understand these processes. SCIMEP's recent work has focused on scientific discourse in online environments, such as Twitter (SCIMEP lab work is available online).

She has published numerous research articles in outlets such as Science, Science Communication, International Journal of Public Opinion, Public Understanding of Science, and Communication Research and has been an expert panelist for the National Academy of Sciences on various occasions.

Brossard earned her M.S. in plant biotechnology from the Ecole Nationale d'Agronomie de Toulouse and her M.P.S and Ph.D. in communication from Cornell University. View her publications in Google Scholars.

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Melissa Charenko

Melissa Charenko

Melissa Charenko is a Ph.D. candidate in the history of science department at UW-Madison and a graduate associate in the Center for Culture History, and the Environment (CHE). Her work focuses on the methods and approaches of paleoecology, and the ways they have been used to reconstruct the deep past. She focuses on how paleoecology's techniques have granted this discipline authority as a prognosticator of future ecological change and as an arbitrator of anthropogenic versus natural change.

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Esteban D. Chiriboga

esteban d. chiriboga

Esteban D. Chiriboga has a B.A. in geography and geology from Indiana State University and a master's in geography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has worked as the environmental specialist for the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) office in Madison, Wisconsin for the past 19 years. Project experience on mining issues includes the technical review of proposed mining projects with an emphasis on the identification of their impacts on tribal traditional lifeways and the natural resources that the traditional lifeway depends upon. Other projects include the characterization of climate change impacts to the ceded territories, treaty resources, and the traditional lifeway; Identification of potential mine sites in the ceded territories of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin; Mapping of fish spawning sites and mine wastes in Lake Superior; Development of tribal fish contaminant databases and fish consumption advisory maps for mercury; Development of methods and data for tribal involvement in FERC dam re-licensing process; Mapping of the known extent of aquatic invasive species infestation in Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin; Mapping of Ojibwe language place names.

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Jane L. Collins

jane collins

Jane L. Collins is professor of community & environmental sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She studies labor and development and is the author a number of books including The Politics of Value: Three Movements to Change How We Think About the Economy and Threads: Gender, Labor and Power in the Global Apparel Industry.

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Katherine Cramer

katherine cramer

Katherine J. Cramer is director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service and a professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her work focuses on the way people in the United States make sense of politics and their place in it. She is known for her innovative approach to the study of public opinion, in which she invites herself into the conversations of groups of people to listen to the way they understand public affairs. She is the author most recently of The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness and the Rise of Scott Walker. Her work has appeared in many venues including the Washington Post, Vox.com, and USA Today. She has spoken with journalists around the globe to share her insights on public opinion, and prides herself on speaking frequently with groups of people who want to achieve justice and democracy for all.

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Calvin B. DeWitt

calvin dewitt

Calvin B. DeWitt is professor emeritus in the Nelson Institute. He has focused his career on addressing the "fragmentation of the disciplines" through development of an integrative program of teaching, research, and public service directed toward ecological integrity and sustainability.

His current research includes groundwater systems in relation to the geologic formations of southern Wisconsin; groundwater stewardship in relation to wetlands, lakes, and municipal high-capacity wells policy; conservation leadership development in the United States and Asia; wetland carbon sequestration in maintaining a habitable biosphere; strategic translation of environmental and global climate change science and ethics into practice; strategic implementation of integrated ethics and science in sustaining the U. S. Endangered Species Act and addressing global climate change; application of integrative interdisciplinary frameworks for science, ethics, and praxis; and biogeographic and trophic structure of the biospheric economy.

Among his many notable accomplishments, DeWitt organized Climate Forum 2002 with Sir John T. Houghton (former co-chair of Working Group 3 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), which engaged 60 leading climate scientists and evangelicals in producing the Oxford Declaration on Climate Change, a statement instrumental in bringing climate issues into the concerns of evangelicals and the wider public.

DeWitt has received many awards, including the National Wildlife Federation's "Connie" Award for his work in bridging environmental science and ethics; the Friends of the United Nations Environmental Programme 500 Environmental Achiever Award; the Capitol Community Citizens Award; the Town of Dunn Stewardship Award; the Environmentalist of the Year Award from the Madison Audubon Society; and a Distinguished Alumni Award from Calvin College. He has also received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Waynesburg University; the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Center for Faith and Scholarship; and the 2009 Forest Steward Award from the National Coalition on Creation Care.

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Sarah Dimick

sarah dimick

Sarah Dimick is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and a graduate associate in the Center for Culture, History, and Environment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her interests span contemporary American and global literature, concentrating on environmental writing of the 20th and 21st centuries. Her research examines literary representations of climate change and fossil fuel consumption.

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Shauna Downs

shauna downs

Shauna Downs, Ph.D., is a Hecht-Levi Fellow with the Global Food Ethics and Policy Program at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. Her research focuses on two main areas: 1) the role of policies and interventions to reorient the food system towards the production and consumption of nutritious foods and 2) the environmental and health trade-offs of the promotion of healthy diets. She conducts research in India, Senegal, Myanmar and New York City using various methodological approaches.

Prior to coming to Johns Hopkins, Downs was an Earth Institute Fellow at Columbia University where her research focused on the impacts of intensified horticultural production, complemented with nutrition education, on nutrition outcomes in Senegal and evidence-informed best practices to promote sustainable diets. Downs received her Ph.D. in public health from the Menzies Centre for Health Policy at the University of Sydney where her work focused on the use of policy to improve the quality of the food supply in India. She also has a master's of science in nutrition from the University of Alberta, Canada.

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Sharon Dunwoody

sharon dunwoody

Sharon Dunwoody, is Evjue-Bascom Professor Emerita in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she served on the faculty for more than 30 years. She studies how people use messages to make judgments about science and environmental issues.

Dunwoody has served as a Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer in Brazil, as a visiting journalism fellow at Deakin University in Australia, as Bonnier Guest Professor at Stockholm University and as visiting professor at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research, and of the Society for Risk Analysis. In 2011, she received the Paul J. Deutschmann Award for Excellence in Research at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC), and in 2013 she received the Hilldale Award for "distinguished professional accomplishments" at UW-Madison.

She has served two stints as head of the section on General Interest in Science and Engineering of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and for 10 years served as the Associate Dean for Social Studies in the Graduate School at UW-Madison. She is currently vice-chair of the Board of Directors of the Aldo Leopold Foundation and co-chairs the Science Advisory Board of the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts.

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Brittany Ederer

brittany ederer

Brittany Ederer, is a graduate student in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Environmental Conservation Professional Master's program. She is a member of the Van Deelen lab in Wildlife Ecology and also a mentor through the Nelson Institute Mentor Match program. Brittany received her B.S. in International Agriculture and Natural Resources from UW-Madison in December of 2012; upon graduation, she became a full-time staff member of a Madison-based Christian environmental nonprofit, Care of Creation, as the Special Projects Coordinator. Brittany also is a Steering Committee member of Young Evangelicals for Climate Action. In her limited free time, she takes her border collie mix to the dog park and enjoys snowshoeing in the Northwoods, climate permitting.

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Irwin Goldman

irwin goldman

Irwin Goldman is professor and chair of the department of horticulture at UW-Madison. His work is in vegetable breeding and genetics and he teaches courses in world vegetable crops, plant breeding, evolutionary biology, and plants and human wellbeing. He and his students develop improved strains of carrot, onion, and table beet and these genetic resources are used in vegetable varieties grown throughout the world.

In 2012, Goldman and a group of colleagues founded the Open Source Seed Initiative, which became a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit entity in 2015. This initiative serves as a certification and collection point for more than 350 crop varieties that carry an open source designation, allowing them to be used by farmers, breeders, gardeners and seed companies in any way they choose, as long as the varieties remain unrestricted for all downstream users. With more than 40 seed company partners selling open source varieties, the Open Source Seed Initiative aims to improve access to crop genetic resources worldwide and free crop seeds from restrictive forms of intellectual property protection.

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Lucas Graves

lucas graves

Lucas Graves Graves is assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. His work examines new journalistic norms, practices, and organisations in the digital age. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Columbia Journalism Review, Wired magazine, and other outlets, and in various academic journals. His book Deciding What's True: The Rise of Political Fact-Checking in American Journalism was published in September 2016 by Columbia University Press, and he is co-author of The Story So Far: What We Know About the Business of Digital Journalism. Previously he worked as a magazine journalist and a media and technology analyst.

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Caitlin Iverson

caitlin iverson

Caitlin Iverson is an Environment and Resources doctoral candidate in the Nelson Institute at UW—Madison. Her research looks at well-being in workplaces, specifically stress management, emotional intelligence and resilience practices in work settings. This work brings together best practices in public health, strategic communication, organizational change and environmental psychology in order to promote sustainable healthy change.

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Lynn Keller

lynn keller

Lynn Keller is the Bradshaw Knight Professor of the Environmental Humanities, an honor awarded her as the director of the Nelson Institute Center for Culture, History and Environment (CHE), and the Martha Meier Renk Bascom Professor of Poetry in the UW-Madison English department. Author of Re-Making it New: Contemporary American Poetry and the Modernist Tradition, Forms of Expansion: Recent Long Poems by Women, and Thinking Poetry: Readings in Contemporary Women's Exploratory Poetics, she specializes in contemporary U.S. poetry.

A Guggenheim Fellowship in 2015-16 enabled her to complete a book manuscript that brings ecocritical perspectives to bear on the formally and linguistically experimental poetries that particularly interest her. Provisionally titled Nature's Transformations: North American Poetry of the Anthropocene, this study -- forthcoming in the "Under the Sign of Nature" series from the University of Virginia Press -- examines 21st century poetry that addresses some of the urgent environmental challenges we face today.

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Galen McKinley

galen Mckinley

Professor Galen McKinley is an oceanographer and climate scientist. She is passionate about sharing the joys and insights from scientific inquiry with her colleagues, students, the public and policy makers. In her research, she studies how the ecology and chemistry of the oceans and Great Lakes respond to climate variability and change, with a particular focus on the global carbon cycle. Her primary scientific tools are computer simulations and analyses of large datasets. Professor McKinley teaches oceanography and climate science in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at University of Wisconsin-Madison, and was also recently named the Bryson Professor of the Nelson Institute's Center for Climatic Research. In addition to research and teaching, McKinley frequently contributes to national and international scientific coordination and offers scientific advice to policy-makers. Learn more at http://mckinley.aos.wisc.edu/.

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Hannah Larson

hannah larson

Hannah Larson is a Master's student in the Environment and Resources degree program at the UW-Madison Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. Her primary research interests are in conservation biology, landscape change, and human-environment systems. Hannah's thesis research, in partnership with the International Crane Foundation and Guizhou University, explores how land use change at southwest China's Caohai Lake is affecting black-necked crane habitat. Prior to graduate school, Hannah worked as a Grants Associate at American Rivers in Washington, DC and an Outreach Coordinator at Potomac Conservancy. She also served in seasonal ecology and trailwork positions in Maine, New York, Utah, and Montana. She is originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota, and attended Bowdoin College in Maine with majors in Environmental Studies and History.

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Patrice Kohl

patrice kohl

Patrice Kohl is a doctoral student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at UW-Madison and a Novel Ecosystems NSF-IGERT fellow. Her research interests cut across several disciplines including science and technology studies, public communication of science and conservation biology. Her dissertation research explores the relationship between public opinion and scientific interventions, and how the public reacts to conservation efforts to prevent extinction.

Kohl has also worked as a journalist reporting on fisheries, environmental issues and outdoor recreation in Alaska, and has worked on collaborative communication projects with the World Health Organization Regional Office for South-East Asia and with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

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Katie Laushman

katie laushman

Katie Laushman is a master's student in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, and studied Biology at Earlham College for her undergraduate degree. Her thesis research is focused on the ecological changes occurring with a recent invasion of an Asian earthworm genus in Madison. Her thesis also considers the use of science communication theory to understand how best to convey messages about invasive species. Katie is passionate about botany, ecology, conservation, and trail work.

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Colleen Moran

colleen moran

Colleen Moran MPH, MS, is the Climate and Health program manager at the Wisconsin Division of Public Health where she manages the Centers for Disease Control grant, Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE). Prior to her current position, Moran was a University of Wisconsin Population Health Service fellow with a placement at the Wisconsin Division of Public Health where she used her background in public health and urban and regional planning to focus her efforts on better understanding the influence of the built environment as an upstream determinant of health.

Colleen has always had a passion for climate issues: before entering graduate school, she managed a small car-sharing company in Madison, Wisconsin, for five years. Moran is an active member of the Wisconsin Public Health Association (WPHA) and co-chairs both the WPHA Climate and Health Section and Health Impact Assessment (HIA)/Health in All Policies (HiAP) Section.

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Rosamond Naylor

rosamond naylor

Rosamond Naylor is the director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment, William Wrigley Professor in Earth Science, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy) at Stanford University. She received her B.A. in economics and environmental studies from the University of Colorado, her M.Sc. in economics from the London School of Economics, and her Ph.D. in applied economics from Stanford University. Her research focuses on economic and biophysical dimensions of food security and environmental impacts of crop and animal production. She has been involved in many field-level research projects around the world and has published widely on issues related to intensive crop production, aquaculture and livestock systems, biofuels, climate change, food price volatility, and food policy analysis. At Stanford, Naylor teaches courses on the World Food Economy, Human-Environment Interactions, and Sustainable Agriculture.

Naylor currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Beijer Institute in Stockholm, is a science advisor for United Nation's Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon's initiative on Sustainable Development (Sustainable Agriculture section), and trustee of The Nature Conservancy California Chapter. Additionally, she serves on the editorial board of the journals Global Food Security and Journal on Food Security.

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Joe Parisi

joe parisi

Joe Parisi has called Dane County home his entire life. Joe sought out public service as a way to give back to a community that has given so much to him. Joe was first elected as County Executive, the chief elected leader of Dane County, in 2011 after 6 years in the State Assembly and 8 years as Dane County Clerk.

Joe's priority is to ensure that everyone in our community has access to the opportunity to succeed. He believes investing in people pays big dividends. Joe knows this can work because he experienced it. As a teenager, Joe dropped out of high school. He was encouraged to return to education through a community program by people who believed in him. So he worked to earn his GED and went on to MATC (now Madison College) and graduated from UW-Madison with a degree in sociology. Now Joe believes it is his turn to give back to ensure that our children's generation has access to the same opportunities that were available to him. Dane County Executive Parisi has accomplished much during his tenure, including leading the effort to clean up our lakes and protect our environment, and taking bold action on climate change. Joe and his wife, Erin Thornley Parisi, are raising their two daughters on Madison's east side.

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Satya Rhodes-Conway

Satya Rhodes-Conway

Satya Rhodes-Conway is the managing director of the Mayors Innovation Project and a senior associate at COWS, a national think-and-do tank based at UW-Madison. She works with cities across the country to implement innovative policy that promotes environmental and economic sustainability and builds strong, democratically accountable communities. She has researched and written extensively about local policy that promotes sustainability, equity and democracy.

Rhodes-Conway served three terms on Madison's City Council, giving her a practical perspective on local government and policy. Before coming to COWS, she analyzed state endangered species programs for Defenders of Wildlife, researched and wrote about progressive environmental policy at the State Environmental Resource Center, and taught undergraduate biology and ecology. She has degrees from Smith College and the University of California - Irvine.

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Olivia Sanderfoot

olivia sanderfoot

Olivia Sanderfoot Sanderfoot is a second-year graduate student at the Nelson Institute. She graduated from UW-Madison in May of 2015 with a B.S. degree in biology, Spanish, and environmental studies and will graduate with an M.S. degree in Environment & Resources this May. Olivia is currently studying how birds are impacted by air pollution at the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, where she is a member of Dr. Tracey Holloway's research group. Olivia's research is funded by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Olivia has previously worked as a communications coordinator for the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team and outreach assistant for the Energy Analysis & Policy program here at the Nelson Institute. In her spare time, Olivia enjoys bird watching, ultimate frisbee, playing piano, baking, and binging on Netflix with her husband and their two cats.

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Harry Saunders

Harry Saunders

Harry Saunders is the managing director of Decision Processes Incorporated. He has consulted at numerous Fortune 100 companies including Chevron, General Motors, and Hewlett Packard, helping executive teams make higher quality decisions in the face of risk.

The "Godfather of rebound," Saunders is widely known as an international expert on energy efficiency and consumption and has also published articles in the fields of evolutionary biology and legal theory. Following Daniel Khazzoom and Leonard Brookes' work on energy consumption and behavior, Saunders coined the "Khazzoom-Brookes Postulate" which broadly states that increased energy efficiency leads to increased energy consumption.

Most recently, Saunders surveyed and analyzed 30 sectors of the United States economy for historical evidence of rebound. Based on his analyses and historical records, Saunders argues that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimates for carbon emissions reduction are based on improper estimations of the rebound effect. A former manager of strategy at Tosco Corporation, Saunders has also worked at the U.S. Department of Commerce and the International Energy Agency.

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Paul Senner

paul senner

Paul Senner is a master's degree candidate in the Enviroment and Resource Program at the Nelson Institute. His research interests include restoration of grassland communities and the conservation of birds and other wildlife. This research specifically focuses on the restoration and management of Tram Chim National Park in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. Once a part of the vast "Plain of Reeds" ecosystem, Tram Chim is now one of only a handful of locations in the Mekong where native habitat persists and is home to a variety of unique wildlife including the Eastern Sarus Crane.

Before attending UW, Senner majored in biology at Lawrence University in Appleton, WI. Since graduating from Lawrence he has worked in a variety of roles including as a prairie restoration technician for Audubon Chicago-Region, a field ecology intern for the International Crane Foundation, the coordinator of a fundraising campaign for the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin and finally as a part of the team that administers Wisconsin's statewide energy efficiency program "Focus on Energy."

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Kevin Shafer

kevin shafer

Kevin Shafer is the executive director of the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD). He is responsible for the overall management, administration, leadership and direction for MMSD in meeting short- and long-term goals and objectives; coordinates the establishment of strategic goals and objectives and their approval by the Commission; oversees the development of policies and operating plans; and represents MMSD to its customers, bond rating agencies, and the public.

Prior to joining the District, Shafer spent 10 years in private industry with an international engineering firm in Chicago and Milwaukee, and six years with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Fort Worth, Texas. He holds a bachelor's degree in science and civil engineering with a specialty in water resources from the University of Illinois and a master's in science and civil engineering from the University of Texas.

He is a past president of the National Association of Clean Water Agencies and the chair of the US Water Alliance's Urban Water Sustainability Leadership Council. He currently serves on the EPA's Local Government Advisory Committee and is the chair of the Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) Board of Directors.

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CeCe Sieffert

cece sieffert

CeCe Sieffert is the Deputy Director of the International Rhino Foundation, which fights to conserve the world's five rhino species. At IRF, CeCe manages field programs in Southern Africa, India, and Indonesia, and leads strategic communications and advocacy efforts to raise awareness of the plights of rhinos globally. With poaching and habitat loss threatening rhinos' extinction, increased awareness and political will to protect rhinos is critical. CeCe works to develop rhino champions at all levels - from communities that share the land with rhinos to business leaders and politicians. An alumna of the Nelson Institute's CBSD program, she previously worked at WWF, focusing on combatting the illegal wildlife trade and demand for illegal wildlife products in the U.S. and Asia.

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Stanley A. Temple

Stanley temple

Stanley A. Temple is the Beers-Bascom Professor Emeritus in Conservation in the UW-Madison Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, and former chair of the Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development program in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. For 32 years, he occupied the faculty position once held by Aldo Leopold, and while in that position he received every University of Wisconsin teaching award for which he was eligible.

Since his retirement from academia in 2008 he has been a senior fellow of the Aldo Leopold Foundation. He and his 75 graduate students have worked on conservation problems in 21 different countries, and have helped save some of the world's rarest and most endangered species. He has received honorary recognitions from the Society for Conservation Biology, Wildlife Society, and Wisconsin Society for Ornithology and an international Chevron Conservation Award and Fulbright Fellowship, all recognizing his distinguished achievements in the field of conservation.

Temple is a fellow of the American Ornithologists' Union, Explorer's Club, New York Zoological Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science and Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. Professor Temple's service to the conservation community at large is extensive. He has been chairman of the Wisconsin chapter of The Nature Conservancy and president of the Society for Conservation Biology. He has served on editorial boards or as editor of Ecological Applications, Conservation Biology, Forest Science, Bird Conservation (which he founded), and The Passenger Pigeon. His bibliography contains more than 330 publications.

Temple's career in conservation and ecology has been characterized by highly respected scholarship in conservation biology and wildlife ecology, by interdisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems, and by energetic contributions to the conservation movement at scales from local to global.

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Adrian Treves

adrian treves

Adrian Treves earned his Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1997 and is now an associate professor of environmental studies at UW–Madison. His research focuses on ecology, law, and agroecosystems where crop and livestock production overlap carnivore habitat. He and his students work to understand and manage the balance between human needs and carnivore conservation. He has authored more than 100 scientific papers on predator-prey ecology or conservation. Most recently, Treves has been writing and speaking on the public trust doctrine.

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Johnny Uelmen

johnny uelmen

Johnny Uelmen is a Ph.D student in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies Environment & Resources program. He is studying the effects of a changing climate on arboviral and other zoonotic diseases, evaluating under the One-Health emphasis. He incorporates geospatial aspects of epidemiology, using GIS and Remote Sensing tools to help understand what we can't see on the ground. His advisor is Dr. Jonathan Patz.

Uelmen completed a M.S. degree in Epidemiology and Entomology, both from UW-Madison. After graduating, he plans to do a bit of teaching, researching, and public health outreach/extension. Global health is truly at the core Uelmen's work. A changing climate has consequences that everyone on this planet must endure. With his research and outreach, he feels the responsibility to help mitigate the negative effects and help plan for a change. Many people in developing countries are put directly in climate change's harmful path. He plans to incorporate his research with a changing climate, infectious diseases, and global health so that he can help educate those most affected, with the end goal of saving lives and lowering morbidity.

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Mike Wheeler

mike Wheeler

Mike Wheeler grew up in a small town in southern New Hampshire, with the foothills of the White Mountains not far away. After graduating from St. Michael's College in 2010 with a bachelor's in biology, he spent three years traveling to work as a technician for different research projects. His first foray in Wisconsin was in 2011, when he interned at the International Crane Foundation. He returned in the fall of 2014 to start a master's program in the Nelson Institute. In collaboration with the International Crane Foundation, he is studying the population dynamics of a population of sandhill cranes in the south-central part of the state.

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Monica M. White

monica white

Monica M. White earned a Ph.D. in sociology from Western Michigan University. She is an assistant professor of environmental justice at UW-Madison with a joint appointment in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and the Department of Community and Environmental Sociology. She is a former Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign. White's research engages communities of color and grassroots organizations that are involved in the development of sustainable community food systems as a strategy to respond to issues of hunger and food inaccessibility. Her publications include, Sisters of the Soil: Urban Gardening as Resistance Among Black Women in Detroit and D-Town Farm: African American Resistance to Food Insecurity and the Transformation of Detroit. Her forthcoming book, Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement, 1880-2010, contextualizes new forms of contemporary urban agriculture within the historical legacies of African American farmers who fought to acquire and stay on the land. Using historical and contemporary examples, the book examines the development of farmers' cooperatives as strategies of resistance, and documents the ways that these organizations, in general, and Black farmers specifically, have contributed to the Black Freedom Movement.

White has received several grants and awards, including a multi-year, multi-million dollar USDA research grant to study food insecurity in Michigan; the 2013 Olsen Award for distinguished service to the practice of Sociology from the Michigan Sociological Association; and the Michigan Campus Compact Faculty/Staff Community Service-Learning Award.

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Erik Olin Wright

erik olin wright

Erik Olin Wright is a Vilas Distinguished Professor at UW-Madison, where he has taught sociology since 1976. His academic work has been centrally concerned with reconstructing the Marxist tradition of social theory and research in ways that attempt to make it more relevant to contemporary concerns and more cogent as a scientific framework of analysis. His empirical research has focused especially on the changing character of class relations in developed capitalist societies.

Since 1992 he has directed The Real Utopias Project which explores a wide range of proposals for new institutional designs that embody emancipatory ideals and yet are attentive to issues of pragmatic feasibility. He was president of the American Sociological Association in 2011-12. His most recent books include Envisioning Real Utopias (2010); American Society: How it really works (with Joel Rogers, 2011; second edition, 2015); Understanding Class (2015); and Alternatives to Capitalism (with Robin Hahnel, 2016).

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David Zimmerman

david zimmerman

David Zimmerman is Elizabeth Ritzmann Professor of English at UW-Madison. He is the author of Panic! Markets, Crises, and Crowds in American Fiction and teaches courses on a wide range of literary topics, including apocalypse; conspiracy; gender and modernity; The Wire; time travel; the American Dream; capitalism and its discontents; moral complicity; sensation fiction; counterfeits, passers, and posers; and ghosts, monsters, and the paranormal.

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