While the only course offered directly through CHE is the Methods Seminar, CHE associates teach courses in departments across the University that explore issues of human and environmental change over time.

Spring 2017 Courses Offered by CHE Faculty Associates

Civil Society & Community Studies 375 003. Community and Environment

Instructor: Leah Horowitz
Monday/Wednesday/Fridays, 11:00 - 11:50AM

Communities around the world face a variety of environmental issues, to which they respond in multiple ways. Using case studies from around the planet, this course will explore ways that communities conceptualize their environments, protect them, and cope with threats to them, with a special focus on grassroots engagements with industrial development.


Legal Studies/Env Studies 430. Law and Environment

Instructor: Richard Keyser
Tuesday/Thursdays, 9:30 - 10:45AM

This class explores environmental studies through a focus on law and legal history. Although its main concentration is on U.S. environmental law, the course will begin and end with broader historical and global perspectives. The first of three units of the class survey the English, European, and early American legal approaches to land use, natural resources, and pollution through World War II. A second unit examines the development and practice of contemporary U.S. environmental law. The final unit considers the recent emergence of international environmental law.


Spanish 468. Topics in Hispanic Cultures: Cultures, Environments and Economies

Instructor: Kata Beilin
Tuesday/Thursdays, 2:30 - 3:45PM

The Anthropocene is a recently coined name for the epoch when humans shape their environment with a force comparable to a geological event. Even if the beginning of the Anthropocene could be dated back to the appearance of the steam engine, the awareness of the Anthropocene, which provides the framework for this class, is born only in the 21st century. In the course of the semester, we will investigate how economy and culture work together, consuming and/or restoring their environments in divergent scenarios of the Anthropocene. Applying perspectives from environmental humanities, we will countervail economistic discourses with stories "from below," featuring human and non-human experiences resulting from existing cultural and economic arrangements. From scenarios of the expansion of a neoliberal global economy, we will move to those of resistance (environmentalism of the poor) and alternative economies (local currencies, eco-villages), where we will encounter new economic theories (ecological economics, feminist economy), and new social movements that seek to live by respecting their local environments. Focusing on chosen localities in the Hispanic World, we will discuss some of the most significant aspects of culture, economy and environment in the global economy and in de-growth scenarios.


English 820. Recent North American Ecopoetics

Instructor: Lynn Keller
Mondays 10:00AM - 12:30PM

We will study volumes of poetry (usually a volume a week) written by diverse poets from the U.S. and Canada addressing environmental challenges in the late years of the 20th and early years of the 21st centuries. Our engagement with that poetry, much of which will be linguistically and formally experimental, will be enriched by reading environmental critics and theorists from Lawrence Buell to Timothy Morton, from Ursula Heise to Catriona Sandilands, Jane Bennett to Stacy Alaimo to Rob Nixon.


Art History 867. Seminar in Architectural History: Methods in Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures

Instructor: Anna Andrzejewski
Tuesdays 2:00 - 4:00PM

This course seeks graduate students in the humanities and social sciences who actively interrogate the material and geographical world to understand its past and present meanings. Participants will critically examine methods of studying the everyday built environment, which includes ordinary buildings, cultural landscapes, and material objects. Students will analyze and compare a wide array of theories and methodological approaches from the last four decades including the work of scholars from the disciplines and fields of Art History, Geography, Landscape History, Environmental History, Urban Studies, Literature, Historical Archaeology, Material Culture, and Folklore. Discussions encourage students to explore the intellectual boundaries of these overlapping academic disciplines while also cultivating their own identities in their chosen fields of study through working on a capstone research project. Research projects this semester will focus on the theme of "Frontier Landscapes of the Anthropocene."


A Sampling of CHE-Related Courses Offered at UW-Madison

What sorts of coursework do CHE grads pursue and faculty offer? This archived list of courses features classes offered here at UW, from 2012 to the present, that may be of interest to the CHE community. (Note that not all courses are currently offered; please check with individual course departments or instructors to inquire about availability for schedule planning.)

AGROECOLOGY
702
The Multifuncationality of Agriculture
AGROECOLOGY
710
Seminar in Agroecology
AGROECOLOGY
720
Agroecology Field Study
AGROECOLOGY
875
Innovations in Specialty Crop Production
ANTHROPOLOGY
319
Peoples and Cultures of the Pacific
ANTHROPOLOGY
330
Anthropology of the United States
ANTHROPOLOGY
354
Archaeology of Wisconsin
ANTHROPOLOGY
355
Archaeology of Eastern North America
ANTHROPOLOGY
365
Medical Anthropology
ANTHROPOLOGY
909
Research Methods and Research Design in Culturual Anthropology
ART HISTORY
457
History of American Vernacular Architecture and Landscapes
ART HISTORY
600
Field School in American Vernacular Architecture
ART HISTORY
867
Seminar in American Architecture: Methods in Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures
BOTANY
672
Historical Ecology
BOTANY
950
Detecting Human Effects on Natural Systems: Baselines, Indicators and Conservation Goals
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
541
Environmental Stewardship and Social Justice
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
650
Sociology of Agriculture
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
754
Qualitative Methods for Sociologists
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
945
Seminar in the Sociology of Agriculture
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
948
Seminar in Environmental Sociology
ENGLISH
822
Recent American Poetry and Ecocriticism
ENGLISH
868
Environmental Literature and Theory in a Global Context
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
402
Green Screen: Environmental Film in History and Action
FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY
565
Principles of Landscape Ecology
FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES / HISTORY
452
World Forest History
FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY
375/875
Historical Ecology
GEOGRAPHY
338
Biogeography: An Ecosystem's Approach
GEOGRAPHY
344
The American West
GEOGRAPHY
370
Introduction to Cartography
GEOLOGY
722
Paleoecology
GEOLOGY
723
Pollen Morphology
GERMAN
372-004
Natur und Umwelt in der deutschsprachigen Kultur und Literatur
HISTORY
227
Modern Global Environmental History
HISTORY
795-001
Digital History
HISTORY
902
Research Seminar: American History: North American Regions, Landscapes and Peoples
MEDICAL HISTORY AND BIOETHICS
213
Global Environmental Health: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
339/639
Technology and its Critics Since WWII
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
350
Green Screen: Environmental Film in History and Action
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
350
History of Climate Science (Cross-listed as Environmental Studies 402)
HISTORY OF SCIENCE / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
353
History of Ecology
HISTORY OF SCIENCE / MEDICAL HISTORY & BIOETHICS / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
513
Environment and Health in Global Perspective
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
615
History of Evolutionary Thought
HISTORY OF SCIENCE / MEDICAL HISTORY & BIOETHICS / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
919
Ecology and Disease in Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
921
Pollution: Past and Present
HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
460
American Environmental History
HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
932
Environmental History
HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
965
History of the American West
HORTICULTURE
375
Assessing Agricultural Sustainability Through Experiential Learning
HORTICULTURE
375
A Growing Dilemma: The Future of Food
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
603
Global AIDS: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
677
Cultural Resource Preservation and Landscape History
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
710
Theories of Landscape Change
LAW
831
Modern American Legal History
LAW
845
Water Rights Law
LAW
848
Environmental Law and Institutions
LAW
988
Special Topics in Environmental Law: Environmental Justice
LIFE SCIENCES COMMUNICATION
444
Native American Environmental Isses and the Media
PHILOSOPHY
441
Environmental Ethics
PLANT PATHOLOGY
375
Organic and Urban Plant Agriculture
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
101
Religion and the Environment (Note: 100-level classes do not count for graduate credit)
STS
403
Special Topics in Science & Technology Studies. The Information Age: Nature and Quantification
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
923
Seminar: Land Problems. Topic: Private Property Rights as Human Rights?