While the only course offered directly through CHE is the Methods Seminar, CHE associates teach courses in departments across the University that explore issues of human and environmental change over time.

Fall 2017 Courses Offered by CHE Faculty Associates

History 705, Med Hist/Hist Sci 919: Commodities and Disease in Global History

Instructor: Gregg Mitman
Tuesdays, 1:00-3:30 p.m.

This seminar seeks to put historical scholarship on the global flows of capital, commodities, and disease in conversation with one another. Our temporal reach is expansive, from the shifting patterns of yellow fever accompanying the Atlantic slave trade to the global threat of avian influenza arising from factory farms and changing diets worldwide. We will consider a range of commodities from cotton and coal to latex and blood to name just a few, to ask what commodities, and associated diseases that accompanied them, can reveal about changing economic, material, political, and social relationships on the global stage. At the same time, we will interrogate the ways that changing ecological regimes of capital have altered and redistributed life both human and non-human and created new disease pathways. We will also attend to the different questions, methods, and forms of evidence that economic, environmental, and medical history bring to a consideration of such questions. This is a historiographic based seminar focused on readings and discussion.


History/Geography/Environmental Studies 460: American Environmental History

Instructor: William Cronon
Special section Wednesday mornings from 8:30-9:45 a.m. for Honors Undergrads and Grads

Environmental history studies the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time - probably a very different approach to history from what you studied in high school. Despite being numbered at the 400-level, this course is intended as an introduction to this exciting and still relatively unfamiliar field of scholarship, with no prerequisites. It assumes little or no background knowledge of American history, geography, or environmental studies, and offers a general survey that can be valuable for students interested in any of these fields, from entry-level undergraduates through advanced graduate students. Although the course is intended to be challenging, it is also meant to be fun: any student willing to attend lectures, do the readings, and work hard should be able to enjoy and do well in it. Our central premise throughout will be that much of the familiar terrain of American history looks very different when seen in environmental context, and that one can learn a great deal about history, geography, and the environment by studying them together. All too often, historians study the human past without attending to nature. All too often, scientists study nature without attending to human history. We will try to discover the value of integrating these different perspectives, and argue that the humanistic perspectives of historians and geographers are essential if one hopes to understand contemporary environmental issues. http://www.williamcronon.net/courses/460/


History / Geography 932: Topics in American Environmental History

Instructor: William Cronon
Tuesdays, 8:50-10:45 a.m.

The seminar is a one-semester introduction to some of the most interesting recent literature of American environmental history, read principally for the theories and methodologies it can offer scholars and scientists as well as its implications for contemporary environmental politics and management. The seminar assumes no previous coursework in the field, and students with a wide variety of backgrounds and disciplines are encouraged to participate. The seminar is designed to provide a general overview of the major theoretical and methodological issues of American environmental history. Emphasis will be on important themes of the historiography, including the historical migration of species; the effects of disease on human communities; the role of different land-use activities in transforming ecosystems; the effects of markets and industrialization on environmental change; changing cultural conceptions of the natural world; the relationship of environmental history to social history and other subfields; the history of conservation and environmental politics; and methodological strategies for analyzing and narrating such topics. We will decide as a group whether to concentrate our written work for the semester on historiographical review; research design; undergraduate pedagogy; or writing beyond the academy in a digital age. The seminar does not provide a systematic chronological overview of U.S. environmental history per se, and those interested in gaining such an overview may wish to consider taking or auditing History/Geography/Environmental Studies 460 or 469 either in tandem with the seminar or as a replacement for it; the courses are designed to be complementary. The seminar is open to students in any field or program, but preference will be given to those who have a continuing research interest in the subject. Please contact William Cronon for more information and for an application.


Environmental Studies 349: Climate Change Governance

Instructor: Leah Horowitz
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Climate change is being felt, and addressed, at every level of society, from the individual to the global scale. This course examines efforts to mitigate climate change. We will learn about initiatives that are being implemented through international treaties; national, state, and municipal government policies; corporate programs; and individual behavior. We will examine the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, their successes, and the obstacles they have faced. We will also evaluate various forms of climate activism as a means of pushing for meaningful action on climate change.


Geography 500: Qualitative Strategies

Instructor: Ian Baird
Wednesdays 3:00-5:30 p.m.

This course is taught as a seminar, and students take a leading role in running the course. Most of those who take the course are graduate students. We cover all the main qualitative methods. This course is only taught once every two years, so don't miss the chance. It is a great course for preparing for fieldwork involving qualitative methods.


Geography 557: Development and Environment in Southeast Asia

Instructor: Ian Baird
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30-3:45 p.m.

This course is taught as a regular lecture course. Both upper level undergraduate students and graduate students take it. It essentially looks at contemporary development and environment issues in Southeast Asia, but in an historically informed way. The main theoretical lens used for examining the cases we look at is political ecology. No previous course work related to Southeast Asia is required.

A Sampling of CHE-Related Courses Offered at UW-Madison

What sorts of coursework do CHE grads pursue and faculty offer? This archived list of courses features classes offered here at UW, from 2012 to the present, that may be of interest to the CHE community. (Note that not all courses are currently offered; please check with individual course departments or instructors to inquire about availability for schedule planning.)

AGROECOLOGY
702
The Multifuncationality of Agriculture
AGROECOLOGY
710
Seminar in Agroecology
AGROECOLOGY
720
Agroecology Field Study
AGROECOLOGY
875
Innovations in Specialty Crop Production
ANTHROPOLOGY
319
Peoples and Cultures of the Pacific
ANTHROPOLOGY
330
Anthropology of the United States
ANTHROPOLOGY
354
Archaeology of Wisconsin
ANTHROPOLOGY
355
Archaeology of Eastern North America
ANTHROPOLOGY
365
Medical Anthropology
ANTHROPOLOGY
909
Research Methods and Research Design in Culturual Anthropology
ART HISTORY
457
History of American Vernacular Architecture and Landscapes
ART HISTORY
600
Field School in American Vernacular Architecture
ART HISTORY
867
Seminar in American Architecture: Methods in Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures
BOTANY
672
Historical Ecology
BOTANY
950
Detecting Human Effects on Natural Systems: Baselines, Indicators and Conservation Goals
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
541
Environmental Stewardship and Social Justice
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
650
Sociology of Agriculture
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
754
Qualitative Methods for Sociologists
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
945
Seminar in the Sociology of Agriculture
COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
948
Seminar in Environmental Sociology
ENGLISH
822
Recent American Poetry and Ecocriticism
ENGLISH
868
Environmental Literature and Theory in a Global Context
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
402
Green Screen: Environmental Film in History and Action
FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY
565
Principles of Landscape Ecology
FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES / HISTORY
452
World Forest History
FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY
375/875
Historical Ecology
GEOGRAPHY
338
Biogeography: An Ecosystem's Approach
GEOGRAPHY
344
The American West
GEOGRAPHY
370
Introduction to Cartography
GEOLOGY
722
Paleoecology
GEOLOGY
723
Pollen Morphology
GERMAN
372-004
Natur und Umwelt in der deutschsprachigen Kultur und Literatur
HISTORY
227
Modern Global Environmental History
HISTORY
795-001
Digital History
HISTORY
902
Research Seminar: American History: North American Regions, Landscapes and Peoples
MEDICAL HISTORY AND BIOETHICS
213
Global Environmental Health: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
339/639
Technology and its Critics Since WWII
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
350
Green Screen: Environmental Film in History and Action
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
350
History of Climate Science (Cross-listed as Environmental Studies 402)
HISTORY OF SCIENCE / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
353
History of Ecology
HISTORY OF SCIENCE / MEDICAL HISTORY & BIOETHICS / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
513
Environment and Health in Global Perspective
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
615
History of Evolutionary Thought
HISTORY OF SCIENCE / MEDICAL HISTORY & BIOETHICS / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
919
Ecology and Disease in Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
921
Pollution: Past and Present
HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
460
American Environmental History
HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
932
Environmental History
HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY / ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
965
History of the American West
HORTICULTURE
375
Assessing Agricultural Sustainability Through Experiential Learning
HORTICULTURE
375
A Growing Dilemma: The Future of Food
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
603
Global AIDS: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
677
Cultural Resource Preservation and Landscape History
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
710
Theories of Landscape Change
LAW
831
Modern American Legal History
LAW
845
Water Rights Law
LAW
848
Environmental Law and Institutions
LAW
988
Special Topics in Environmental Law: Environmental Justice
LIFE SCIENCES COMMUNICATION
444
Native American Environmental Isses and the Media
PHILOSOPHY
441
Environmental Ethics
PLANT PATHOLOGY
375
Organic and Urban Plant Agriculture
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
101
Religion and the Environment (Note: 100-level classes do not count for graduate credit)
STS
403
Special Topics in Science & Technology Studies. The Information Age: Nature and Quantification
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
923
Seminar: Land Problems. Topic: Private Property Rights as Human Rights?