17
Feb

An Evening of Readings from "becoming-Botanicals: A Post-Modern Liber Herbalis"
6:00PM, Village Community Cohousing
Set to be published in the coming year, "becoming-Botanicals: A Post-Modern Liber Herbalis," is a collection of writing and art intended to help us contemplate the ways we interact and depend on plant-life in a post-modern era, and to catalyze creative thinking and artistic practice in the widening field of sustainability and performance ecologies. Gather for a fireside reading of select poems and prose from this project. This event will take place at 6:00 pm for potluck dinner; hot chocolate + desserts offered at 7:00 pm; and select readings at 7:15 pm. CHE is a co-sponsor of this event.

20
Feb

"Liquid Decolonial: Seas, Oceans, and Rivers in the Age of Racial Anthropocene" with Françoise Vergès
7:30PM, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery H.F. DeLuca Forum
Activist and scholar Françoise Vergès (Chair Global South(s), Maison des sciences de l’homme, Paris) will give a Humanities Without Boundaries Lecture on a decolonial theory of water. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, is the inaugural event in the 2019-2020 Mellon Sawyer Seminar on "Interrogating the Plantationocene," co-sponsored by the Center for Culture, History, and Environment.

21
Feb

"A Roundtable on the Anthropocene"
7:30PM, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery H.F. DeLuca Forum
This roundtable, the second event in the 2019-2020 Mellon Sawyer Seminar on "Interrogating the Plantationocene" co-sponsored by the Center for Culture, History, and Environment, will be a conversation between Gabrielle Hecht (Professor of History, Stanford University), Dan Richter (Professor of Soils and Forest Ecology, Duke University), and Françoise Vergès (Chair Global South(s), Maison des sciences de l’homme, Paris). The event is free and open to the public.

7
Mar

"Extreme Weather" with Judith Helfand, Dan Vimont, Richard Keller & Heather Swan, moderated by Steve Paulson
5:30PM, Discovery Building H.F. DeLuca Forum
This Humanities NOW event begins with a screening of Cooked: Survival by Zip Code by Sundance-award winning filmmaker Judith Helfand on the 1995 Chicago heat wave and how we think of disaster preparedness. The screening will take place at 5:30 PM and will be followed by light refreshments, and a panel discussion on the topic of extreme weather begins at 7:30 PM. The conversation will include Judith Helfand; Dan Vimont, director of the Nelson Institute’s Center for Climatic Research; Richard Keller, author of Fatal Isolation: The Devastating Paris Heat Wave of 2003; and Heather Swan, author of Where Honeybees Thrive. The panel will be moderated by Wisconsin Public Radio's Steve Paulson. This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Culture, History, and Environment at the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and the Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center for Science & Technology Studies.

27
Mar

"Chemical Violence and Decolonial Futures" with Michelle Murphy
7:30PM, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery H.F. DeLuca Forum
Michelle Murphy (Professor of History, University of Toronto) will give a Humanities Without Boundaries Lecture asking: what better concepts are there for understanding the relationship between settler colonialism and petrochemical-based economies of extraction and pollution? The lecture, which is free and open to the public, is also part of the 2019-2020 Mellon Sawyer Seminar on "Interrogating the Plantationocene," co-sponsored by the Center for Culture, History, and Environment.

28
Mar

"A Roundtable on the Capitalocene"
7:30PM, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery H.F. DeLuca Forum
This roundtable, part of the 2019-2020 Mellon Sawyer Seminar on "Interrogating the Plantationocene" co-sponsored by the Center for Culture, History, and Environment, will be a conversation between Shona Jackson (Associate Professor of English, Texas A&M University), Jason Moore (Professor of Sociology, Binghamton University), and Michelle Murphy (Professor of History, University of Toronto). The event is free and open to the public.

2
Apr

"Making the Environment out of Nature" with Libby Robin
12:00PM, Helen C. White 7191
Join CHE for a special colloquium with guest Libby Robin. The English word environment was derived from the ancient practice of ‘environing’ or clearing home-places in vast and fearsome wild woods. Centuries later – when the English woods were just a memory and wilds everywhere were increasingly rare, ‘the environment’ was reinvented to suit a time when what was left of nature needed nurture, not fear, as the Great Acceleration of change was upon the Earth. The environment was at the heart of the way the West defined nature and natural resources in the 1940s era of post-war reconstruction. It was a concept for managing what was left. Professional environmental managers concentrated not so much on the nature celebrated by amateurs to the aspects amenable to ‘development’. Nature’s future, rather than its timeless present, was the focus of planners and environmental modellers, working at national and global scales. Filtering nature through economic necessity has changed what we see and how we relate to nature. Defining it as an economic resource has rescaled the environment to the planetary scale, as economies themselves have expanded and globalized. Where the ‘eco’- root of both ecology and economy originally referred to a personal household, in the second half of the 20th century, it came to mean ‘nature’ for some. For others, global economic forces were no longer connected to ideas of nature at all. The environmental revolution arose in lock-step with the digital revolution. The rise of Big Data has equipped scientific understanding of the planetary scale. The view of the small, blue planet from space has inspired both rocket science and a new sense that there is "Only One Earth”. The questions of limits – to resources, to freedom, to food, to habitat – and increasingly to the basics of life, including clean air and water, has driven the eco-disciplines and the transdisciplinary sciences of the Earth along different paths, but all are concerned about questions of environmental limits in the 21st century. Libby Robin is an historian of science and environmental ideas. She is Professor at the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University and Senior Research Fellow at the National Museum of Australia's Centre for Historical Research.

15
Apr

"Doomstead Days" with Brian Teare
7:00PM, Central Library - Community Room 302
Presented in partnership with the UW-Madison Program in Creative Writing and the Wisconsin Book Festival, Brian Teare offers readers a new kind of nature poem—one that both anticipates and contributes to the renewal of public dialogue about environmental ethics and individual responsibility instigated by the UN’s recent report on climate change. Doomstead Days is a lyrical series of experiments in embodied ecological consciousness. Drafted on foot, these site-specific poems document rivers, cities, forests, oil spills, mountains, and apocalyptic visions. They encounter refineries and urban watersheds, megafauna and industrial toxins, each encounter intertwining ordinary life and ongoing environmental crisis. Days pass: war- time days, days of love and sex, sixth extinction days, days of chronic illness, all of them doomstead days. Through these poems, we experience the pleasure and pain of being a body during global climate change. Brian Teare is the recipient of poetry fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the MacDowell Colony, the Fund for Poetry, the Marin Headlands Center for the Arts, and the American Antiquarian Society. He is the author of five full-length books, The Room Where I Was Born, Sight Map, the Lambda-Award-winning Pleasure, Kingsley Tufts finalist Companion Grasses, and The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven. He’s also published seven chapbooks, and is Associate Professor at Temple University in Philadelphia.

18
Apr

"An Evening of Conversation with Donna Haraway and Anna Tsing"
7:30PM, Union South Varsity Hall
The concluding event of the Spring 2019 semester of the 2019-2020 Mellon Sawyer Seminar on "Interrogating the Plantationocene," co-sponsored by the Center for Culture, History, and Environment, will be an evening of conversation with Donna Haraway (Distinguished Professor Emerita in the History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz) and Anna Tsing (Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz). The event is free and open to the public.

13
May

Changing Landscapes of Indigeneity: Place-Based Workshop 2019
8:00AM, Science Hall 175
Our annual Place-Based Workshop, a multi-day program involving field trips and overnight stays, will be held on the theme "Changing Landscapes of Indigeneity" in 2019. This workshop will run May 13-16, and is open to CHE Associates. For more information about getting involved in the planning of this workshop, please see our Place-Based Workshop page.